Citrus Memorial to Offer Online Seminar on Obesity as Weight Gain Affects Citrus County | Local News


As obesity continues to rise both nationally and in Citrus County, the Citrus Memorial Hospital will offer a free online course on Tuesday providing participants with a general overview of obesity and weight loss options, including gastric sleeve surgical procedures.

The online address to register is invernesssurgical.com/services/bariatric-surgery.

Obesity can lead to reduced life expectancy, chronic health problems such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, osteoarthritis, and some forms of cancer.

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Citrus Memorials’ Weight Loss Surgery Program is led by weight loss surgeon Dr Parth Patel of Inverness Surgical Associates. The surgery and the program also include education and weight management strategies.

“The first important step in making a decision regarding weight loss surgery is understanding the options available, as well as the potential benefits and risks,” according to the Citrus Memorial Hospital website.

The registration website also includes a body mass index calculator for potential candidates to determine if they might be candidates for the robot-assisted procedure.

Generally, minimally invasive surgery is appropriate for patients with a body mass index of 40 or more. People with a body mass index of 35 to 40 may also be eligible if they suffer from health issues related to obesity.

Those interested in learning more about the procedure should also collect evidence of previous unsuccessful attempts at nonsurgical treatment for obesity.

They must also demonstrate a commitment to follow-up care, including a clear understanding of the dietary, exercise and medical guidelines required after surgery and throughout their lives, ”according to the Citrus Memorial website.

Obesity is not unique to Citrus County.

More than 70 million Americans are obese, according to etatofobesity.org.

Until recent decades, obesity mainly affected adults. But recently childhood obesity has also become a big problem.

From the mid-1980s to the mid-2010s, obesity roughly doubled in American children aged 2 to 5 and tripled in children 6 and older, according to the National Institutes of Health.

In 2017-18, about 19.3% of American children and adolescents between the ages of 2 and 19 were obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It was 25.6% for Hispanic children, 24.2% for black children, 16.1% for white children and 8.7% for Asian children, according to the CDC.

This is important because overweight or obese children are five times more likely to be obese or overweight adults than children of normal weight, according to Healthline Media.

The data for Citrus County is worrying.

As of 2019, the most recent year data is available, 31.2% of adults in Citrus County were obese, according to Florida HealthCharts, which collects and compiles county health data from county health departments. This was more than the Florida average of 27%.

When Citrus County’s obesity rate is divided by gender, nearly 34% of adult men in Citrus County are obese, according to Florida HealthCharts. For women, it was 28.6%.

The age group that experienced the highest obesity rates in Citrus County was 45 to 64, according to Florida HealthCharts. In Citrus County, nearly 42% of people aged 45 to 64 were obese. It was almost 10 percentage points above the Florida average for this age group.

For those 18-44 years old, almost 26% were obese in Citrus County. It was three percentage points above the Florida average for this age group.

Obesity costs Americans $ 147 billion each year, according to the CDC.

And people who are obese pay more out of pocket than people who are not, with medical costs for people who are obese $ 1,429 more each year than people of normal weight, according to the CDC.

In 2017, all 50 states had an obesity rate of over 20%, just two decades ago, no state had a rate above 15%, according to the CDC.

Today, Americans consume 23% more calories than they did in 1970, according to the CDC.


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